BIO - Biology

Course Number/Title

Course description

Prerequisites

Cr

BIO 100 Introduction to College Biology (for non-science majors)

This course is designed to give non-science majors who are not entering the health career field an introduction to core concepts in biology that are highly relevant in today’s society. Alternatively, this class can be taken by aspiring biology majors who have not completed high school biology.  Specifically, it is intended to develop critical-thinking skills and foster student interpretation of scientific information when making decisions regarding relevant social issues. Students will be introduced to the following biological principles: process of science, cell structure, basic chemistry, molecules of life, genetics, evolution, energy flow within ecosystems, and ecology.

None

3 Credits

BIO 101 College Biology/Lab I

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to basic biological concepts. Topics include: basic cell structure, movement of materials in and out of the cells, tissues, organs and organ systems, chemicals of life and mitosis, enzymes and classification of organisms and ecological relationships, biological molecules, photosynthesis, respiration and structure of DNA.

BIO 100 or CXC/GCSE Biology

4 Credits

BIO 102 College Biology/Lab II

This course covers the basic biological anatomy and physiology of animals. Labs will include the identification of organs making up the major organ systems. The basic physiology of digestion, respiration, transport, coordination, excretion, homeostasis, reproduction and inheritance will be covered. Labs will include dissection of rats or cats. This course is good for entry into nursing courses.

BIO 101

4 Credits

BIO 110 Human Nutrition

(Previously SCI 210)

This course integrates principles from chemistry, physiology, biochemistry and sociology as they relate to the study of nutrition. The course introduces the science of nutrition with a focus on the macronutrients (carbohydrates, lipids, protein) and the micronutrients (vitamins and minerals). The principles of nutritional assessment will also be introduced and students will use specialised software to analyse their estimated three-day food record. The evolution and application of dietary standards will be discussed in detail. Students will take part in discussions concerning current nutrition issues such as healthy weights, and vegetarianism.

None

3 Credits

BIO 111 Nutrition through the Lifecycle

(Previously SCI 211)

This course builds on the nutrition foundation established in SCI 210. The specific nutrition requirements and challenges faced during the lifecycle (infancy, childhood, adulthood, and the later years) will be explored. The course will also explore contemporary issues in nutrition including, but not limited to, GMO, disease prevention, and food safety.

BIO 110

3 Credits

BIO 204 Concepts of Biology I

This course is primarily intended for science majors; however, it can be taken as an elective by any other major with the expressed permission of the lecturer. The course brings out the inquiry about the world of life. It will pro- vide a basic introduction to the diversity of life forms such as viruses, archaea, bacteria, protistan diversity and fungi. General principles of biology are covered as well as intro- duction to genetics, chromosomes, genes and practical applications of DNA technology.

BIO 102

4 Credits

BIO 205 Concepts of Biology II

This course is primarily intended for science majors; however it can be taken as an elective by any other major with the expressed permission of the lecturer. The course will discuss Big Bang Theory versus Creation Theory, Natural Selection and Evolution. Evolution will be the underlying theme with emphasis placed on presenting diversity within a phylogenetic framework. General principles of biology are covered, as well as comparative structure, physiology, immunity and development, including major evolutionary trends. The course will provide a basic introduction to the Origins of Species as noted by Sir Charles Darwin and general plant diversity.

BIO 204

4 Credits

BIO 206 Cell Biology/Lab

This course is a rigorous detailed study of cell structure and function at the molecular level with a special emphasis on the technology and instrumentation required to study the complex processes within the small volume of space in a eukaryotic cell.  Topics include cellular evolution, enzymes and biochemical pathways, plasma membrane structure and function, cytoplasmic membrane systems, cytoskeleton and cell motility, gene expression and control, cell signaling and signal transduction, cancer and immunology. 

BIO 101

4 Credits

BIO 207 Genetics/Lab

Genetics is a four-credit course designed to give the student an overview of the discipline of genetics, the study of the transmission of biological properties from parents to the offspring. This course introduces the principles of transmission, molecular, population, and quantitative genetics. The laboratory activities will teach students basic skills in classic and modern genetics.

BIO 206

4

Credits

BIO 210 Anatomy & Physiology 1

An organ to system approach, the correlation between anatomical structure and physiological functions, the interaction of chemicals, tissues, organs and organ systems in the maintenance of homeostasis is presented in this course. The course is divided into two parts. Part I introduces anatomy and physiology and focus on the integumentary, musculo-skeletal, nervous, endocrine, and respiratory systems. Anatomy and Physiology II covers the remaining body systems, and is taught in the second semester. Laboratory exercises are included in both courses. An understanding of the structure and functions of the human body will provide a frame- work for sound clinical judgement in the management of patients’ health problems.

Co-requisite: BIO 102

4 Credits

 

BIO 211 Anatomy &Physiology 2

Anatomy and Physiology II is a continuation of Anatomy and Physiology I. The course examines the structure and function of the cardiovascular, lymphatic, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Laboratory exercises will allow the students to focus on the examination of selected parts of these systems through histological and skeletal preparations.

BIO 210

4 Credits

BIO 213 Basic Nutrition for Nurses

(Previously SCI 213)

This course introduces students to the principles of human nutrition and current dietary trends across the lifecycle. It emphasises nutrients, food sources and functions in the body, nutrients and the relationship to health throughout the lifespan of the Caribbean people with a focus on the Cayman Islands. Content includes cultural and economic influences on dietary practices.

BIO 120

3 Credits

BIO 214 Diet Therapy in Nursing

(Previously SCI 214)

The focus of this course is dietary management of common nutritional problems found in individuals, families and communities in the Cayman Islands. Emphasis will be placed on the dietary management of individuals with diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular and renal diseases, malnutrition, burns, and obesity. Diet management is applied throughout the respective nursing courses.

2 Credits

BIO 220 Marine Biology

Marine biology is the study of life in the oceans and other saltwater environments such as estuaries, mangroves, coral reefs, hydrothermal vents or open ocean. The study of marine biology includes a wide variety of disciplines such as biological oceanography, chemistry, geology, meteorology, physical and oceanography. An emphasis in this course is on the new field of marine conservation biology which additionally draws on many longstanding scientific disciplines such as marine ecology, biogeography, zoology, botany, genetics, fisheries biology, anthropology, economics and law. Like all scientific disciplines, the study of marine biology also follows the scientific method.

BIO 101

4 Credits

BIO 230 Microbiology for Nurses

An introduction to the history of microbiology, eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell structure and taxonomy. The course also covers the diversity of microbes, as well as their nutritional needs, growth and reproduction. In addition, the course focuses on the control of microbes by physical and chemical agents, microbial ecology, pathogenicity, immunity and immune response. Laboratory exercises are included.

BIO 210 & BIO 120

3 Credits

BIO 235 Epidemiology in Nursing

This course introduces the student to the key concepts of epidemiology. It examines the modes of disease transmission characteristics of communicable diseases, methods of prevention, at the local, regional and international levels. Students will be guided in the identification of sources of data, the use of appropriate measures of calculations, the analysis and interpreting of data and the application of findings to infection prevention and control.

BIO 230 & COM111

3 Credits

BIO 308 Sexually Transmitted Diseases/International Public Health

During this biological inquiry, students will discuss basic information and common issues regarding sexually transmitted diseases. They will classify the organisms causing the most com- mon genital STDs in the world and in the Cayman Islands and describe these diseases. The principles of and special requirements for prevention of STDs will be covered, along with the treatment of the most common STDs and the main ways in which they can be controlled. This course is primarily intended for science majors, however it can be taken as an elective by any other major with the expressed permission of the lecturer.

BIO 102

3 Credits

BIO 310 Human Anatomy and Physiology I

This is the first part of the course in Human Anatomy and Physiology designed to meet requirements for nursing students and students preparing for careers in certain health sciences. Topics covered include animal cell structure and function, cell chemistry, cell division, metabolism, tissues, skeletal system and nervous system. Detailed anatomical and physiological structures of various systems in the body and their functions, aging and disease are considered. There will be the opportunity to share research findings through class discussion and a variety of instructional modes will be used including laboratory exercises, lectures, research and presentations.

BIO 102

4 Credits

BIO 311 Human Anatomy and Physiology II

This is the second part of the course in Human Anatomy and Physiology designed to meet requirements for nursing students and students preparing for careers in certain health sciences. Topics covered include animal endocrinology, Cardiovascular systems, Metabolism, Lymphatic system, Nutri- tion, Urinary system, Digestive system, Reproductive system, development and inheritance. Detailed anatomical and physiological structures of various systems in the body and their functions, aging and disease are considered. There will be the opportunity to share research findings through class discussion and a variety of instructional modes will be used including laboratory exercises, lectures, invited medical doctor, research and presentations. Dissections of rats, cats and use of sheep hearts are part of the course.

BIO 310

4

Credits